Posts Tagged ‘Harry Potter’

Embracing Imperfections

Today was an amazing day! I had such a great time I forgot to write a post. Totally cheating, I am copying and pasting an essay I wrote for my church over the summer, as a part of a service called “what truths do you feel are worthy of being fulfilled?” I hope you like it.

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When Becca asked me to do this, I immediately said yes… In my head anyway. It actually took a little longer to really tell her. However, as soon as I finally agreed the dread set in. What on earth would I talk about, and how badly could I manage to mess it up? There are many truths I would consider worthy of fulfilling, so many how could I possibly keep it down to 5 minutes.

It was suggested that I speak about embracing imperfections. This feels less like a truth I hold up and more like the universe’s lesson plan for the last 29 years of my life… But the truth is that you could say embracing imperfections has been my life’s work.

I was, believe it or not, a quiet and reserved child. I did everything I could to deflect attention from myself. I wanted nothing more than to create, laugh loudly, and spread joy. I was held back by a constant fear of imperfection. I turned inward, I wrote, I created… But those too were locked away. My fear of being less than perfect had prevented me from living.

There are countless traditions where imperfect art is the goal. From Wabi Sabi to Amish quilts, creating pieces with intentional mistakes makes a larger statement. But it is the more mundane human aspects of imperfection that have touched me more. American writer Catherine Drinker Bowen once said “Writers seldom choose as friends those self-contained characters who are never in trouble, never unhappy or ill, never make mistakes and always count their change when it is handed to them.” I found this true of myself, seeking out those who live life fully and authentically. The types of women who called stretch marks “tiger stripes” and embarrassing moments “good stories.” I realized that by protecting myself, I was robbing them of this same experience, this same intimacy. I was pretending to be something less than what I was, and we were all the worse for it.

Admitting imperfections has taught me humility, humor… Maybe some day it will teach me grace. It allows a person to be vulnerable, to discover that those cracks and blemishes are really doors and windows to allow others in. They are glue to create connection. There is something really freeing about saying “so, that just happened. Now what?” In allowing others to laugh with you. In letting your embarrassment be a lesson.

I see myself as a teacher. When my own girls shred their drawings because they wrote the letter “N” backwards I know the way I live is important. When I hear that a woman want to wait to lose that last 10 pounds to buy a cute new outfit. When friends decide they can wait and start their passion only when the wind is right and all other obligations tended to completely. I find I am often a better teacher than I am a student. I embrace this imperfection in myself, for how many can teach a master class when still taking remedial lessons?

This isn’t a goal with a clear benchmark, and that is kind of the point. The truth to uphold is that we are constantly evolving, delightfully imperfect beings who can use these experiences to connect and grow. We all want to come across as having it all together, being on top of everything, good at things at the first try… but as Albus Dumbledore said in the “Harry Potter” novels… “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.

So Let’s Talk About Harry Potter

So, this is late, I am sick, and my laptop refuses to read my camera’s memory card. This means I’m gonna talk about Harry Potter.

Now, I am a pretty big fan. I read it as an adult despite being the target age when it was released (I was 12 in 1998) but I have dedicated myself to making up for it ever since. I am a fan. My knowledge of this world is encyclopedic. I manage to talk about Harry Potter DAILY. it is a thing. Right now I am really into GoT (oooooh, there are youtube videos about Targ dragon riding genes) but Harry Potter will always be my main fandom.

So I am one of those people who felt that prequels were unnecessary. We got the highlights regarding Dumbledore, Snape, and the Marauders.  Their stories culminated in Harry’s story. At best, we get a fanservice connect the dots. At worst? We risk discovering the ability to wield a wand comes from “wiziclorians.”

So when it was announced that there would be a “Harry Potter” prequel based on a text book, I was skeptical. But it was not about Harry at all; it had it’s own story! Written by Rowling herself! Well cast, set in America!

What could go wrong?

Go ahead, click that link. Discover that the American term for “Muggle” is “No-Maj” (and it is pronounced “no-madge.” I love that they turned the g into a j, I feel like there is a .gif joke to be made.)

Just. Stop.

So, all “stupid uncreative American” stereotypes aside, I could totally see this being a slang term in modern America. Oh, the hashtags.

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I am aware “wiztwit” is hardly more creative, but I am not turning it into a movie.

You guys, this is being set in 1920′s New York. Have you heard 1920′s slang? It is the opposite of literal. You can look it over here if you are interested, but wow. No-maj, short for no magic? I suppose if you really wanted to, you could claim that that the magical culture was so alienated from mainstream culture that they have their own slang, but I feel like that still goes back to the “uncreative Americans” well. Will there be a scene where our British protagonist hears the term and cracks about “how creative” it is?

The fear is real you guys. The fear is real (as well as my possibly irrational fear that all Americans will be speaking in a cigar wagging caricature of the transatlantic accent.) I am still totally going to watch this movie (obviously) but come on. I don’t think me from 2 months ago would have believed that this movie was going to be questionable but the “Cursed Child” play would be good, but this is where I am with this. (Also, I hope they plan a way for the wider audience to see this play. Uh, for a friend.)

So, what do you think? Am I too worked up over this? Do you agree? Are you gonna watch this anyway?